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Table 7 Determinants of wage dispersion, pooled years

From: The evolution of wage inequality within local U.S. labor markets

  Pooled OLS Fixed-effects Fixed effects (reduced model)
  (1) (2) (3)
Manufacturing \(-\)0.071\(^{***}\) \(-\)0.082\(^{***}\) \(-\)0.089\(^{***}\)
(0.042) (0.028) (0.027)
Managerial intensity 0.212\(^{***}\) 0.099\(^{**}\) 0.102\(^{***}\)
(0.110) (0.030) (0.030)
Finance 0.002 \(-\)0.036  
(0.545) (0.134)  
Immigrant share 0.226\(^{***}\) 0.155\(^{***}\) 0.150\(^{***}\)
(0.031) (0.019) (0.027)
Technology 0.334\(^{***}\) 0.195\(^{**}\) 0.222\(^{***}\)
(0.086) (0.102) (0.097)
Union coverage \(-\)0.050\(^{***}\) 0.018  
(0.027) (0.014)  
Minimum wage \(-\)0.175\(^{***}\) \(-\)0.016\(^{*}\) \(-\)0.131\(^{**}\)
(0.030) (0.010) (0.010)
Demand 0.071\(^{***}\) 0.010  
(0.008) (0.006)  
Constant 0.292\(^{***}\)   
(0.029)   
Adjusted \(R^{2}\) 0.59 0.61 0.60
F-Statistic 108.09 16.49 21.82
  1. A total of \(n = 170\) metropolitan statistical areas over \(t = 18\) time periods. Samples include persons between the ages of 18 and 65 years old, currently employed and worked in the prior year. Wage inequality is measured as the log residual variance of real weekly earnings of all non-self-employed workers. Clustered robust standard errors are reported beneath in parentheses. Critical F values depend on df(9; 170), df(8; 169), and df(8; 169) respectively. Asterisks (*, **, ***) denote statistical significance at the 10, 5, and 1% levels