Open Access

Erratum to: Germany—No Country for Old Workers?

Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschungJournal for Labour Market Research201144:95

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12651-011-0095-1

Published: 28 October 2011

The original article was published in Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung 2011 44:92

Erratum to: ZAF DOI 10.1007/s12651-011-0092-4

The authors have asked us to clarify and correct the last paragraph of Sect. 3 on page 8 of their article.

Instead of

Nevertheless, turnover rates have already revealed that starting a new job for older workers is seldom. This can also be seen by looking at the transitions from unemployment to employment. In 2010 about 21 per cent of all transitions of older workers out of unemployment led into unsubsidized employment while this figure amounts to about 30 per cent for the group between 25 and 49 years. This picture also arises when calculating the transition rate from unemployment to unsubsidized employment. In the year 2010, 3.9 per cent of the stock of older unemployed moved into unsubsidized employment while the ratio is about 7.2 per cent for unemployed between 25 and 49 years. The older unemployed people get, the poorer is their chance to find a job. For the age group from 55 to 59 the transition rate is 3.3%, for the 60 plus only 2.1%. The difficulties of bringing older unemployed back to work result in higher long-term unemployment. Compared to all unemployed the ratio of long-term unemployment among workers aged 50 plus is about 41 per cent in 2010 which is much higher than the share of 18 per cent referring to all unemployed. These figures approve once again that bringing older unemployed back to work is still a difficult job and therefore persistent unemployment within this group remains a major problem.

the paragraph should read (changes are highlighted in bold):

Nevertheless, turnover rates have already revealed that starting a new job for older workers is seldom. This can also be seen by looking at the transitions from unemployment to employment. In 2010 about 21 per cent of all transitions of older workers out of unemployment led into unsubsidized employment while this figure amounts to about 30 per cent for the group between 25 and 49 years. This picture also arises when calculating the monthly transition rate from unemployment to unsubsidized employment. In the year 2010, 3.9 per cent of the stock of older unemployed moved into unsubsidized employment while the ratio is about 7.2 per cent for unemployed between 25 and 49 years. The older unemployed people get, the poorer is their chance to find a job. For the age group from 55 to 59 the transition rate is 3.3%, for the 60 plus only 2.1%. The difficulties of bringing older unemployed back to work result in higher long-term unemployment. Compared to all unemployed the ratio of long-term unemployment among workers aged 50 plus is about 41 per cent in 2010 which is higher than the share of 32 per cent referring to all unemployed. These figures approve once again that bringing older unemployed back to work is still a difficult job and therefore persistent unemployment within this group remains a major problem.

The publisher apologizes for any inconvenience caused by these mistakes.

Notes

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung

Copyright

© Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung 2011